Disabled Woman Has to Leave Homeless Shelter Every Morning



In the United States, the typical homeless shelter only allows homeless people to stay at night, kicking people out in the morning even in bad or cold weather.

Tammy is disabled and homeless in Denver, Colorado. The homeless shelter where she stays wakes people up at 4:30 am to be out of the building by 6:30 am. Tammy says she is walking “bone on bone.” She doesn’t have any cartilage in her left knee causing her to fall a lot. Tammy can hardly walk. She cannot work. After exiting the shelter in the morning, she has absolutely nothing to do all day.

Tammy ended up homeless after having surgery. The cost of housing was too much and she ended up in a homeless shelter. When I asked her what she would like people to know about homelessness she responded, “we cannot afford a thousand dollars for an apartment.” Tammy continues that people who are elderly or disabled need low-income housing.

Your voice can help end homelessness. If we do not fix the affordable housing crisis, homelessness will continue to get worse. Click here to tweet, email, call, or Facebook your federal and state legislators to tell them ending homelessness and creating more affordable housing is a priority to you.

Special thanks to Mayors and CEOs for US Housing Investment

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Since its launch in November 2008, Invisible People has leveraged the power of video and the massive reach of social media to share the compelling, gritty, and unfiltered stories of homeless people from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. The vlog (video blog) gets up close and personal with veterans, mothers, children, layoff victims and others who have been forced onto the streets by a variety of circumstances. Each week, they’re on InvisiblePeople.tv, and high traffic sites such as YouTube, Twitter and Facebook, proving to a global audience that while they may often be ignored, they are far from invisible.

Invisible People goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages can understand, and can’t ignore. The vlog puts into context one of our nation’s most troubling and prevalent issues through personal stories captured by the lens of Mark Horvath – its founder – and brings into focus the pain, hardship and hopelessness that millions face each day. One story at a time, videos posted on InvisiblePeople.tv shatter the stereotypes of America’s homeless, force shifts in perception and deliver a call to action that is being answered by national brands, nonprofit organizations and everyday citizens now committed to opening their eyes and their hearts to those too often forgotten.

Invisible People is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to changing the way we think about people experiencing homelessness.

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