Integrating Human and Mouse Studies in Fragile X Syndrome – an NIH Center Approach



This virtual seminar series addresses a wide range of current topics in Fragile X research. Hosted by FRAXA and organized by Michael Tranfaglia, MD and Patricia Cogram, PhD, sessions feature outstanding speakers from universities and the biotech and pharmaceutical industries.

—– Presentation Abstract —–
Craig Erickson – Translational medicine and mechanistic studies of brain neurophysiology in Fragile X Syndrome: A NIH Center Overview
Ernest Pedapati – Network Mechanisms, Biomarkers, and Pharmacology of Fragile X Syndrome in Humans
Devin Binder – Network Mechanisms of Neurophysiology and Behavior in mouse models of Fragile X Syndrome
Kimberly Huber – FMRP Regulation of local and long-range neocortical circuits in the mouse: Links with EEG phenotypes

—– Speakers —–
Craig A. Erickson, MD
Professor of Psychiatry at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Ernest Pedapati, MD, MS, FAAP
Associate Professor at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Devin K. Binder, MD, PhD
Associate Professor in the Division of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside

Kimberly M. Huber, PhD
Professor of Neuroscience and Southwestern Medical Foundation Scholar in Biomedical at UT Southwestern Medical Center

—– Timestamps —–
0:00 Intro with Dr. Michael Tranfaglia
1:13 Translational medicine and mechanistic studies of brain neurophysiology in Fragile X Syndrome: A NIH Center Overview
13:42 Network Mechanisms, Biomarkers, and Pharmacology of Fragile X Syndrome in Humans
25:43 Network Mechanisms of Neurophysiology and Behavior in mouse models of Fragile X Syndrome
42:17 FMRP Regulation of local and long-range neocortical circuits in the mouse: Links with EEG phenotypes
1:02:12 Questions and Answers
1:25:58 Closing remarks

—– About FRAXA —–
FRAXA’s mission is to find effective treatments and ultimately a cure for Fragile X syndrome. We directly fund research grants and fellowships at top universities around the world. We partner with biomedical and pharmaceutical companies, large and small, to bridge the gap between research discoveries and actual treatments.

Treatments for Fragile X are likely to help people affected by autism, Alzheimer’s, and other brain disorders.

To learn more about FRAXA’s Fragile X syndrome research, to get involved with Fragile X awareness and events or to donate to FRAXA research, visit www.fraxa.org

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